SGMA in the News

Santa Clarita Valley files lawsuit against Whittaker Corporation

August 10, 2018

From The Signal:

“SCV Water filed a lawsuit Wednesday against the Whittaker Corporation, seeking to cover the cost of removing two harmful contaminants — volatile organic compounds and perchlorate — from the Santa Clarita Valley groundwater basin.

The suit was filed in the U.S. Central District Court of California, comes ahead of just months ahead of when Whittaker claims it will be

“Despite the recent news accounts and public relations charm campaign to depict the Whittaker site cleanup as ‘nearly complete,’ the legacy of their historic contamination of the community’s groundwater basin remains to be fully addressed,” said Matt Stone, general manager of SCV Water, in a prepared statement Thursday. … “

Continue reading from The Signal by clicking here.

Category: News Article

FloodMAR: Using floodwaters for groundwater recharge

August 8, 2018

From Maven’s Notebook:

Flood-MAR is an integrated water resource management strategy that uses flood waters resulting from rainfall or snowmelt for managed aquifer recharge on agricultural lands and working landscapes. Flood-MAR can also be implemented at multiple scales, from individual landowners diverting flood water with existing infrastructure to using extensive detention/recharge areas and modernizing flood management infrastructure and operations.

With the implementation of the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act as well as the effects of climate change necessitating changes in how water is managed in California, Flood Managed Aquifer Recharge, or Flood-MAR, potentially presents a sustainable strategy that can simultaneously accommodate longer and deeper droughts along with more severe and frequent flooding.

In a July 2018 webinar, Kamyar Guivetchi, Manager of the Division of Statewide Integrated Water Management with the California Department of Water Resources (DWR), discussed the importance of the Flood MAR concept and what DWR and other state agencies are doing to advance the concept.  … “

Click here to read this article at Maven’s Notebook.


New groundwater rules hurting ag land prices

August 7, 2018

From the Business Journal:

“Groundwater sustainability agencies (GSAs) in Tulare, Fresno, Kings and Kern counties have until 2020 to develop plans for long-term viability of their regions’ supplies.  In other California counties where state officials deem the groundwater overdraft problem less critical, their GSAs will have until 2022 to finalize their plans.

Once those plans are done, the various groups will have 20 years to implement them, with a common goal of halting in their areas the overdraft of groundwater.

The law requiring these plans, the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act (SGMA), already is having a big effect on prices for agricultural land, particularly in the areas from Madera County down to Kern county, where some of the most severe over drafting in the state commonly occurs. … “

Read more from The Business Journal by clicking here.

Category: News Article

Four Ways to Foster Cooperation over Groundwater

August 6, 2018

From Ellen Hanak and Jelena Jezdimirovic at the PPIC Blog:

“Last summer, some 250 local groundwater sustainability agencies (GSAs) were formed―the first step in meeting the requirements of California’s historic Sustainable Groundwater Management Act (SGMA).  Now these agencies face the difficult task of developing and implementing plans to bring their groundwater basins into balance over the next 20 years.

A recent event by the Groundwater Resources Association of California explored groundwater governance, and laid out ways that locals will need to cooperate to manage groundwater for long-term sustainability. Here are four key takeaways. … “

Continue reading at the PPIC blog by clicking here.

Category: PPIC Blog

California Groundwater Law Means Big Changes Above Ground, Too

August 6, 2018

From Water Deeply:

California’s new groundwater management law is not a sports car. It moves more like a wagon train. The rules do not require critically overdrafted aquifers to achieve “sustainability” until 2040. But 22 years from now, once they finally get there, lives will be transformed.

The Sustainable Groundwater Management Act (SGMA), adopted in 2014, will change more than groundwater. The requirement to end overdraft will also transform land use, a massive side effect yet to be widely recognized.

Parts of California will literally look different once the law takes full effect. It could put some farmers out of business. It could change how others farm. … “

Read more from Water Deeply here:  California Groundwater Law Means Big Changes Above Ground, Too

Category: News Article
Keywords: Land Use

Farmers tap free-market ideas in bid to rescue aquifer

August 6, 2018

From E&E News:

“A debate has raged for decades over the true price of water in the parched West.  Edgar Terry’s answer: Let the market decide.  The farmer is on the cusp of launching the country’s most robust groundwater trading market: cap and trade for water.

“We all deal in markets every day,” Terry said during a recent tour of his vegetable fields. “What makes water any different than oil? If you have oil under your ground, you get to pump it and sell it. And it becomes an asset on the balance sheet. Why can’t water become an asset?”

His timing couldn’t be better. … “

Continue reading at E&E News here.

Category: News Article

Four Ways to Foster Cooperation over Groundwater

August 6, 2018

From the PPIC blog:

“Last summer, some 250 local groundwater sustainability agencies (GSAs) were formed―the first step in meeting the requirements of California’s historic Sustainable Groundwater Management Act (SGMA).  Now these agencies face the difficult task of developing and implementing plans to bring their groundwater basins into balance over the next 20 years.

A recent event by the Groundwater Resources Association of California explored groundwater governance, and laid out ways that locals will need to cooperate to manage groundwater for long-term sustainability. Here are four key takeaways. … “

Click here to read at the PPIC Blog.

Category: News Article

Indian Wells Valley Water District discusses future role with Groundwater Authority

August 2, 2018

From the Ridgecrest Independent:

“When the Indian Wells Valley Water District board of directors held its midyear workshop on Tuesday, one topic took center stage: its role in the IWV Groundwater Authority.

The Water District stands poised to take over leadership of the Groundwater Authority board and general manager in January. Leadership rotates among three of the five member agencies, known as “The Big Three” — the City of Ridgecrest, Kern County, and the Water District.

“Hopefully we will have an opportunity to move ahead in the direction we all see as working for the ratepayers and the district,” said board president Ron Kicinski. … “

Read more from the Ridgecrest Independent by clicking here.

Category: News Article

As Soquel wastewater treatment plant study end draws near, public plies district with questions

August 2, 2018

From the Santa Cruz Sentinel:

“Soquel resident Wayne Stanton wants to know how long it will be before he can go back to having lawns and vegetable gardens.

Stanton was one of a handful of community members on Tuesday at Twin Lakes Church to take up Soquel Creek Water District on their offer to comments on and question a draft environmental study for its proposed Pure Water Soquel project. The water district is in the midst of studying potential impacts of building a new treatment plant that would pump purified wastewater into the area’s groundwater basins. The report highlights treatment plant construction noise, plus well pumping during operations, as the project’s only major environmental impact for which mitigation measures cannot counteract. … “

Continue reading at the Santa Cruz Sentinel by clicking here.

Category: News Article
Region: recharge

KCBX Two-way: Groundwater in the Cuyama Valley

August 2, 2018

From KCBX:

“In 2014, state lawmakers passed the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act or SGMA. It changed everything about how groundwater will be used in the future. But will it work?

Jeremy P. Jacobs is a reporter for E&E News. That’s a non-partisan news service based in Washington DC. Jacobs is one of the news service’s California-based reporters. He recently took a close look at the Cuyama Valley, on the Central Coast. Jacobs wrote about what he found in an article that appeared in Greenwire, a publication of E&E News. His article is part of a series called “When The Wells Run Dry.”

KCBX News spoke with Jacobs about his reporting in the Cuyama Valley, and started by asking him how he got interested in groundwater—and in that particular place. … “

Continue reading at KCBX by clicking here.

Category: News Article